Justice

I am certain that this will open the doors to intensive philosophical debate, perhaps for decades to come.

Last night I am sitting with my son at the Phillies-Mets game here in Philadelphia. Randy Wolf, the Phillies starting pitcher, pitches 8 superb innings, but he is out of gas to start the 9th inning and allows 3 successive singles to the top of the Mets order. The manager wisely decides that a change is needed. Tim Worrell, a veteran relief pitcher, makes his way to the mound and strikes out Mike Piazza for out number 1. But then, with the count 3 balls and 0 strikes, he grooves one to Cliff Floyd, who sends it somewhere over the continent of Europe to make the game 5-4. He holds on to get the next two outs and we win, but INJUSTICE has occurred.

Wolf gets charged with 3 runs in his official stats because his were the 2nd and 3rd runs to score on the homerun by Worrell. Yet doth this not lack equity? I believe (and here is where you may disagree with my belief system) that the pitcher giving up the homerun thereof shouldst be charged with half of the runs he alloweth that wouldst otherwise be charged to the previous hurler.

What say ye, brethren and sisters??

6 comments:

Larry said...

No runs shouldst be charged to the pitcher who retireth; only the pitcher that alloweth the runs by his thupidity.

Peter Bogert said...

I semi-concur. Both the one who letteth and the one who enabled the letting thereof shouldst be charged. But in a faireth way.

Milton Stanley said...

Maybe I'm just siding with the powers that be here, but it was Wolf, after all, who let those runners get on base without getting anyone out. If he'd stayed in the game, Wolf may well have been the guy to serve up a pitch for Floyd (or even Piazza) to send flying. I think the rule is as fair as you can make such a thing when it comes to blaming one man for earned runs.

Bob Gerdsen said...

Peter, hast thou been reading the King James version? Whenst haast thou started to speak Elizabethan English? Otherwise, charge the runs to the previous pitcher.

Anonymous said...

Sometimes baseball is theological for if a person sins does he not deserve to be credited with that sin that he commits even if it is small. He should be like a man who owns up to his mistakes; therefore, Wolf's runs were earned, and JUSTICE is served.

Peter Bogert said...

Sigh. Alas, I have been corrected! Thank you all for rescuing me from error.